Dynamix II

Miami’s David Noller and Scott Weiser, aka Dynamix II, are among a very few of the first wave of American electro and bass music artists to have successfully translated their old-school credentials into new-school relevance. The producers behind classic roof-raisers “Bass Generator,” “Ignition,” and “Just Give the DJ a Break,” Noller and Weiser carved out a signature niche in early electro with a kitchen-sink-style megamix approach, amplifying electro’s energy level, deepening the low-end, and playing up its robotic themes with ample vocoded vocals and squirty electronics.

The group formed in 1985 after Noller, a local DJ who had recently started making tracks, met Weiser and the two began building a studio together. Noller was signed to Bass Station records at the time, and Dynamix appeared through a handful of other Miami labels before the pair set up their eponymous imprint in 1988. Although mostly of only local interest beginning in the late ’80s, when electro died out in favor of rap, the group got a big boost nearly a decade later, when U.K.-based label Rephlex — owned by Richard James, aka Aphex Twin — reissued lectro Megamix: 1985-Present, an all-in-one-place collection of their biggest tunes from over the years, and originally released on the Joey Boy label in 1997.

A stream of new material has appeared since then, including “We Are Your Future” and “The Plastic Men,” both through Joey Boy. A collaboration with British producer Ian Loveday, aka Eon, also appeared through Wax Trax/TVT in 1999. Additionally, Dynamix II have remixed fellow Florida group Rabbit in the Moon and Expansion Union. Most of their LPs and singles from throughout the years remained in print.

https://www.globaldarkness.com/articles/dynamix_ii_bio.htm

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Bongeziwe Mabandla teams up with uSanele on ‘Bekezela’

We played Bongeziwe Mabandla on our show a while ago and he has a new track out with an artist that also sparked our attention: uSanele.

Tune in to our show on Wednesday and you might very well hear this tune.

Bongeziwe Mabandla gets trapped out with uSanele on ‘Bekezela’

10 Dope South African Albums & EPs That Came Out This Month

Gangular EP by uSanele on Google Play

Gangular EP by uSanele on Spotify

Gangular EP by uSanele on Apple Music

#SouthAfrica #music #bands

Gqom

First things first: how the hell you pronounce it?

The name itself sounds like the boom of a bassline. Meaning “drum” in Zulu, Gqom is pronounced as a single syllable and starts with a palatal click reminiscent of the rhythmic kick drums of the genre.

from Gqom—The Sound from the Townships of South Africa – Indie Guides Magazine

Better than trying to explain music, you should just listen to it:

But if you prefer reading, here are some links:

#music #SouthAfrica

“Zanku (Leg Work)” video by Zlatan Ibile

From OkayAfrica:

Is Zanku Set to Be the New Dance Craze of 2019?

Breaking down what could become the year’s new dance craze.

With last week’s release of the video for “Zanku (Leg Work),” Zlatan Ibile has consecrated himself as the originator of the newest dance craze in afropop.

The specific origin of the name ‘zanku’ is uncertain but the dance itself, says Ibile in this interview from December, is one he noticed from his visits to The Shrine in Lagos and refashioned into a trend.

The best zanku, so far, works best in beats combining repeated foot tapping or pounding, with hands held aloft, and finished with a flourish—a stylised thrusting of one foot as if to knock down a door. Variations include a faster footwork, mimicry of slicing and screwing hand motions and the brandshing of a white kerchief, all of which is done with vigour and attitude.

#music #dance #Africa